Nevada Casinos Under Investigation for 111 Health and Safety Breaches

Nevada Casinos Under Investigation for 111 Health and Safety Breaches

Potential non-compliance

The Nevada Gaming Control Board has launched an investigation into 111 cases of potential non-compliance from casinos in the state regarding new health and safety protocols.

the board could take disciplinary action

The enforcement division of the board has conducted 7,461 observations and inspections of restricted and unrestricted licensees, leading to the investigation. The board could take disciplinary action if it is proven that a given license holder has not been compliant, according to a news release published Tuesday.

As there are almost 2,500 gaming licensees in Nevada, this means that on average, each gambling property has undergone observation and inspection three times since June 4. Approximately 1.5% of all inspections resulted in further probes. 

No specifics given

No details were given as to what sort of potential violations are being investigated or what type of disciplinary action may be taken. However, a member of the Nevada Gaming Control Board said last week that the board is considering suspending the gaming licenses of errant operators. 

In the news release, board chief of enforcement James Taylor said:

The Board has worked 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to monitor gaming licensees’ compliance with the Board’s Health and Safety Policies.”

To monitor the observance of the health and safety protocols, the board is working alongside a number of other organizations. These include the Las Vegas Business License Department, the Clark County Business License Department, and the Nevada State Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

All information that is given to the state’s gaming board regarding compliance of licensees will be kept confidential. 

A serious issue

The new health and safety protocols were put in place to protect workers, their families, and patrons alike amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. With cases rising once more across the United States, Governor Sisolak and the Nevada regulators do not want to take any chances. 

Casinos in Las Vegas were ordered to close on March 17 by Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. They started reopening from June 4, albeit with restrictions such as enforced social distancing, reduced capacity, and use of cashless options. To date, there have been 19,151 confirmed cases of the virus in Nevada, with 512 deaths.

Some of the most recent measures mandated by the authorities include that all guests and employees have to wear masks when they are not smoking, drinking, or eating inside gambling establishments. Caesars Entertainment properties offered patrons $20 in free play to certain patrons wearing masks when playing slots before face coverings became a requirement.

New lawsuit filed

Many of the workers at Nevada casinos are also not happy with these facilities’ inadequate level of compliance with health and safety rules. The local Culinary Workers Union and Bartenders Union filed a joint lawsuit against a number of properties earlier this week, alleging hazardous working conditions.

To date, 19 members of the two unions and/or their dependents have died from the coronavirus since March 1.

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